MOCSA Recognized for Innovative and Effective Workplace Practices

MOCSA Recognized for Innovative and Effective Workplace Practices

Receives prestigious When Work Works Award

KANSAS CITY, Mo.─ the Metropolitan Organization to Counter Sexual Assault (MOCSA) has been honored with a 2017 When Work Works Award for exemplary workplace practices.

The prestigious When Work Works Award is part of the Society for Human Resource Management’s (SHRM’s) When Work Works project, a national initiative that helps employers become more successful by transforming the way they view and adopt effective and flexible workplaces.

The award recognizes employers of all sizes across the country that are excelling at offering a variety of top-rated employee initiatives such as work-life fit policies, flexible scheduling and transition to parenthood programs. The award goes beyond work-life programs and includes initiatives that address the additional evidence-based aspects of effective workplaces, such as opportunities for learning, a culture of respect and trust and job autonomy.

“MOCSA is honored to receive the 2017 When Work Works Award in recognition of our positive and flexible work environment,” said Julie Donelon, MOCSA President and CEO. “MOCSA’s innovative and passionate staff shape our culture and we value their ongoing commitment to our mission. Creating a supportive workplace is one of many ways that we can acknowledge the incredible talents they bring to the Kansas City community.”

In applying for the award, MOCSA was evaluated on factors associated with employee health, well-being and engagement: opportunities for learning; a culture of trust; work-life fit; supervisor support for work success; autonomy; and satisfaction with earnings, benefits and opportunities for advancement.

“These winners have reinvented their workplaces in ways that benefit business and employees alike and are reaping the benefits in terms of employee job satisfaction and retention,” said Cassidy Solis, senior advisor, workplace flexibility, at SHRM.

The award is earned after a rigorous assessment that emphasizes the real-life experiences of employees and incorporates national benchmarks of employer practices from the National Study of Employers and the employee experiences from the National Study of the Changing Workforce. Two-thirds of an organization’s winning score is based on a survey of its employees.

MOCSA exists to improve the lives of those impacted by sexual assault and abuse and to prevent sexual violence in our community. MOCSA provides free-of-charge services to more than 65,000 individuals annually. More information at www.mocsa.org.

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News Release
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
May 24, 2017


FOR MORE INFORMATION:
Cheyenne Clonch
Human Resources Manager
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
(816) 285-1373


PDF of this release

NNEDV National Survey Results

Survey Reveals Impact of Increased Immigration Enforcement on Victims Experiencing Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault

Washington, DC (May 18, 2017) – On May 18th, seven national organizations – including Asian Pacific Institute on Gender-Based Violence (APIGBV), ASISTA, Casa de Esperanza: National Latin@ Network, National Alliance to End Sexual Violence (NAESV), National Domestic Violence Hotline (NDVH), National Network to End Domestic Violence (NNEDV), and Tahirih Justice Center – working to end domestic violence and sexual assault released the results of the 2017 Advocate and Legal Service Survey Regarding Immigrant Survivors.

These partner organizations recognized an urgency to collect data and identify trends based on reports from their constituencies signaling increased fear and reluctance on the part of immigrant survivors to seek assistance from law enforcement or the courts, and uncertainty on the part of advocates on how to advise immigrant survivors.

"Laws and policies that deter immigrant victims from calling 911 create an impossible choice for them: they must either stay with their abusers or risk deportation," said Archi Pyati, Chief of Policy and Programs at the Tahirih Justice Center. "We cannot turn a blind eye to this. These policies make us all less safe."

A total of 715 victim advocates and attorneys in 46 states and the District of Columbia completed the survey and reported how changing immigration policies affects the concerns of service providers and immigrant survivors of domestic violence and sexual assault.

The survey documents that 78 percent of advocates reported that immigrant survivors expressed concerns about contacting police. Similarly, three in four service providers responding to the survey reported that immigrant survivors have concerns about going to court for a matter related to the abuser/offender. Finally, 43 percent of advocates worked with immigrant survivors who dropped civil or criminal cases because they were fearful to continue with their cases.

Current policies regarding immigration enforcement efforts, such as executive orders that cast a much wider net of who is considered a priority for immigration enforcement and calls for increased involvement of local and state law enforcement in federal immigration enforcement efforts, have had an impact on immigrant survivors of domestic violence and sexual assault and local service providers.

"Service providers are trying to help immigrant survivors navigate a lot of uncertainty, and assessing whether there is any risk to them for reaching out for protection," said Cecelia Friedman Levin, Senior Policy Counsel at ASISTA, a national leader on immigration remedies for survivors of domestic violence and sexual assault.

"Compelling increased entanglement between local law enforcement and federal immigration enforcement will erode community policing efforts, undermine access to safety and justice for immigrant victims and their children, and undermine public safety," said Rosie Hidalgo, Director of Public Policy for Casa de Esperanza: National Latin@ Network.

The survey findings also revealed that 62 percent of respondents observed an increase in the number of immigration-related questions that their agencies were receiving from immigrant survivors.

"Escaping domestic violence is already difficult for immigrant survivors," said Kim Gandy, President and CEO of NNEDV. "The current environment makes it even more frightening for victims to come forward and seek help."

"Like many of the organizations represented in the survey, we have consistently noticed that immigrant victims and survivors who’ve contacted us are hesitant to report abuse because of a heightened fear of deportation due to their immigration status,” said Katie Ray-Jones, CEO of NDVH. “Relatives, friends, and neighbors of immigrant abuse victims who might have reported abuse in the past have also shared that they are now wary of doing so for fear that they might be targeted for deportation."

Congress created important protections for immigrant survivors of domestic violence, sexual assault, and human trafficking in the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) and Trafficking Victims Protection Act (TVPA) in the express recognition that perpetrators often exploit a victim’s lack of immigration status as a tactic of abuse. The U and T visa program in the 2000 reauthorization of VAWA was created to "strengthen the ability of law enforcement agencies to detect, investigate, and prosecute cases of domestic violence, sexual assault, trafficking… and other crimes created against aliens, while offering protection to victims of such offenses in keeping with the humanitarian interests of the United States."

"Our organizations are calling on federal government, Congressional leaders, state and local authorities, and law enforcement to reinforce the intent of VAWA and the TVPA and demonstrate their support for immigrant survivors by helping create an environment that does not leave them in the shadows," said Grace Huang, Policy Director of APIGBV. "Current proposals that undermine community policing and intensify deportation practices put the most vulnerable victims at risk."

"We urge officials to share our vision of ending domestic and sexual violence," said Monika Johnson Hostler, President of NAESV. "To do so authorities must demonstrate their support for immigrant survivors of these crimes."

Read the Survey Key Findings report to learn more about the results of the 2017 Advocate and Legal Service Survey Regarding Immigrant Survivors.


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For more information please email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. since several staff monitor this email and can provide a speedy response.

Monica McLaughlin, Deputy Director of Public Policy
National Network to End Domestic Violence
Cell: 312-316-7238
Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Rebekah Stewart, Program Communications Associate
Tahirih Justice Center
Phone: 571.550.9162 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

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Partner agencies include:

  1. The Asian Pacific Institute on Gender-Based Violence (formerly, Asian & Pacific Islander Institute on Domestic Violence) is a national resource center on domestic violence, sexual violence, trafficking, and other forms of gender-based violence in Asian and Pacific Islander communities. The Institute serves a national network of advocates and community-based service programs that work with Asian and Pacific Islander and immigrant survivors, and is a leader on providing analysis and advocacy on critical issues facing victims in the Asian and Pacific Islander and immigrant communities. The Institute leads by promoting culturally relevant intervention and prevention, expert consultation, technical assistance and training; conducting and disseminating critical research; and informing public policy.
  2. ASISTA is a nonprofit 501(c)(3) that provides national leadership, advocacy, training, and technical assistance to those working with crime survivors seeking secure immigration status, especially those who have suffered gender-based violence. To learn more about ASISTA, visit www.asistahelp.org.
  3. Casa de Esperanza is a nonprofit 501(c)(3) that seeks to mobilize Latinas and Latino communities to end domestic violence. Founded in 1982 in Minnesota to provide emergency shelter for women and children experiencing domestic violence, in 2009 Casa de Esperanza launched the National Latin@ Network for Healthy Families and Communities. The National Latin@ Network is a national institute focused on preventing and addressing domestic violence in Latino communities, providing national training and technical assistance, policy advocacy and research. To learn more about the organization, please visit casadeesperanza.org and nationallatinonetwork.org.
  4. The National Alliance to End Sexual Violence (NAESV) is the voice in Washington for the 56 state and territorial sexual assault coalitions and 1300 rape crisis centers working to end sexual violence and support survivors. The local rape crisis centers in our network see every day the widespread and devastating impacts of sexual assault upon survivors and provide the frontline response in their communities advocating for victims, spreading awareness and prevention messages, and coordinating with others who respond to these crimes.
  5. The National Domestic Violence Hotline is a non-profit organization established in 1996 as a component of the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA). Operating around the clock, confidential and free of cost, The Hotline provides victims and survivors with life-saving tools and immediate support. Callers to The Hotline at 1-800-799-SAFE (7233) can expect highly trained advocates to offer compassionate support, crisis intervention information and referral services in more than 200 languages. Visitors to TheHotline.org can chat live with advocates and they can find information about domestic violence, safety planning, local resources, and ways to support the organization.
  6. The National Network to End Domestic Violence (NNEDV) is a nonprofit 501(c)(3) organization that serves as a leading national voice for domestic violence victims and their allies. NNEDV’s membership includes all 56 state and territorial coalitions against domestic violence, including over 2,000 local programs. NNEDV has been advancing the movement against domestic violence over 25 years, having led efforts among domestic violence advocates and survivors in urging Congress to pass the landmark Violence Against Women Act of 1994. To learn more about NNEDV, please visit NNEDV.org.
  7. The Tahirih Justice Center is the only national, multi-city organization providing both policy advocacy and direct, on the ground legal services to immigrant and refugee women and girls fleeing violence. Tahirih will continue to monitor policy shifts that impact women and girls fleeing violence and advocate for the United States to honor its legal obligations to protect those fleeing human rights abuses.

NSVRC Press Release - Visionary Voice Awards 2017

National Sexual Violence Resource Center Recognizes Leaders in Sexual Assault Prevention With 2017 Visionary Voice Awards

Recipients include trailblazers in advocacy, legislation and the justice system

PRESS RELEASE: FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Enola, PA, April 11, 2017 – The National Sexual Violence Resource Center (NSVRC) announced today 32 recipients of its 2017 Visionary Voice Awards—a multidisciplinary group of honorees from across the nation selected for their outstanding work toward ending sexual violence.

This year’s recipients include Brenda Tracy, a sexual assault survivor and advocate who frequently speaks to collegiate athletics programs and recently launched the “Set the Expectation” pledge campaign aimed at male college and high school athletes; Louisiana State Rep. Helena Moreno, who championed legislation for equal pay, sexual and reproductive health, domestic violence and sexual assault; and Pennsylvania Superior Court Judge Jack Panella, who advocates for a trauma-informed judicial system and provides training for judges and attorneys throughout the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.

The Visionary Voice Awards are presented annually by NSVRC, the leading nonprofit in providing information and tools to prevent and respond to sexual violence, in conjunction with Sexual Assault Awareness Month (SAAM). SAAM is a national campaign held each April to raise awareness about preventing sexual violence. This year’s theme, “Engaging New Voices,” is aimed at increasing engagement from faith leaders, parents, members of Greek life, coaches, men and the general public to combat this widespread issue. Nearly one in five women in the United States have experienced rape or attempted rape in their lives, and one in 71 men have experienced rape or attempted rape.

“NSVRC is honored to recognize the essential work of these 32 leaders in the sexual violence prevention movement,” said Karen Baker, NSVRC Executive Director. “We all have a role to play in the prevention of sexual assault, and new voices in the movement will have a ripple effect on those they teach, guide and influence. These recipients have dedicated their lives to helping the next generation foster attitudes that promote healthy relationships, equality and respect.”

Nominated by state, territory and tribal sexual violence coalitions across the U.S., the following is a complete list of this year’s Visionary Voice Award recipients:

  • Mimi Kim (Nominated by the California Coalition Against Sexual Assault)
  • Lorena Garcia (Nominated by the Colorado Coalition Against Sexual Assault)
  • Judy Blei (Nominated by the Connecticut Alliance to End Sexual Violence)
  • Shaumia Craig (Nominated by the DC Rape Crisis Center)
  • Lane Frye (Nominated by the Florida Council Against Sexual Violence)
  • Juan M. Rapadas (Nominated by the Guam Coalition Against Sexual Assault and Family Violence)
  • Janene Radke (Nominated by the Kansas Coalition Against Sexual and Domestic Violence)
  • Helena Moreno (Nominated by the Louisiana Foundation Against Sexual Assault)
  • Vicki Sadehvandi (Nominated by the Maryland Coalition Against Sexual Assault)
  • Strong Oak Lefebvre (Nominated by Jane Doe, Inc, the Massachusetts Coalition Against Sexual Assault and Domestic Violence)
  • Kalimah Johnson (Nominated by the Michigan Coalition to End Domestic and Sexual Violence)
  • Sarah Deer (Nominated by the Minnesota Coalition Against Sexual Assault)
  • Laura Hacquard (Nominated by Missouri Coalition Against Domestic and Sexual Violence)
  • Drew Colling (Nominated by the Montana Coalition Against Domestic and Sexual Violence)
  • Lindsey Spaulding (Nominated by the Nebraska Coalition to End Sexual and Domestic Violence)
  • Shizue Hill [deceased] (Nominated by the Nevada Network Against Domestic Violence)
  • Emily Murphy (Nominated by the New Hampshire Coalition Against Domestic and Sexual Violence)
  • Jackson Tay Bosley (Nominated by the New Jersey Coalition Against Sexual Assault)
  • Claire Harwell (Nominated by the New Mexico Coalition of Sexual Assault Programs, Inc.)
  • Beverly Kiohawiton Cook (Nominated by the New York State Coalition Against Sexual Assault)
  • Katie Hanna (Nominated by the Ohio Alliance to End Sexual Violence)
  • Brenda Tracy (Nominated by the Oregon Coalition Against Domestic and Sexual Violence)
  • Jack Panella (Nominated by the Pennsylvania Coalition Against Rape)
  • Carmen Castelló Otiz (Nominated by Coordinadora Paz para la Mujer, Inc.)
  • Catherine Lea (Nominated by the Day One Coalition)
  • Dr. Anne Frier Fisher (Nominated by the South Dakota Network Against Family Violence and Sexual Assault)
  • Sally Marie Helton (Nominated by the Tennessee Coalition to End Domestic and Sexual Violence)
  • Stephanie Schulte (Nominated by the Texas Association Against Sexual Assault)
  • Colleen Twomey (Nominated by the Vermont Network Against Domestic and Sexual Violence)
  • Celia Guardado (Nominated by the Washington Coalition of Sexual Assault Programs)
  • Sarah J. Brown (Nominated by the West Virginia Foundation for Rape Information and Services)
  • Jennifer Zenor (Nominated by the Wyoming Coalition Against Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault)

To learn more about the 2017 Visionary Voice Award recipients, visit: nsvrc.org/saam/award.

ABOUT NSVRC

The National Sexual Violence Resource Center (NSVRC) is the leading nonprofit in providing information and tools to prevent and respond to sexual violence. NSVRC translates research and trends into best practices that help individuals, communities and service providers achieve real and lasting change. The center also works with the media to promote informed reporting. Every April, NSVRC leads Sexual Assault Awareness Month (SAAM), a campaign to educate and engage the public in addressing this widespread issue. NSVRC is also one of the three founding organizations of Raliance, a national, collaborative initiative dedicated to ending sexual violence in one generation. The organization was chartered in 2000 by the Pennsylvania Coalition Against Rape.


Laura Palumbo, Communications Director
National Sexual Violence Resource Center
877-739-3895, ext. 128; This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

PDF of this release

Press Release - Audrie & Daisy Screening

Student Groups Screen Documentary & Host Talkback
Highlighting Sexual Assault

[PITTSBURG, KANS. – April 3, 2017] – Students for Violence Prevention (SVP) in coordination with Safehouse Crisis Center, the Tilford Group, Student Alliance for Gender Equality, and Gorillas in Your Midst present are hosting a screening of the urgent real-life drama, Audrie & Daisy, including a talkback panel with SafeBAE speakers featured in the documentary.

Audrie & Daisy is an urgent real-life drama that examines the ripple effects on families, friends, schools and communities when two underage young women find that sexual assault crimes against them have been caught on camera. From acclaimed filmmakers Bonni Cohen and Jon Shenk (The Island President, The Rape of Europa), Audrie & Daisy — which made its world premiere at the 2016 Sundance Film Festival — takes a hard look at American’s teenagers who are coming of age in this new world of social media bullying, spun wildly out of control.

Jada Smith, Ella Fairon, and Charlie Coleman, co-founders of SafeBAE, will be featured on the talkback panel. Jada Smith, is the outspoken survivor who sparked the #JusticeforJada campaign. After Jada’s rape went viral she fought back, appearing on major news outlets, which ignited support from people all over the globe including celebrities such as Willow Smith and Gabrielle Union. Jada is still seeking justice and continues to advocate for sexual assault and cyber bullying prevention.

Ella Fairon took back her voice after her assault, and began to advocate for herself and other survivors of sexual violence. Ella founded the student group Buttervly, at her high school and led awareness projects and organized a Powder Puff Game called “Tackling Rape Culture”.

Charlie Coleman is known for his impactful contribution the acclaimed film Audrie & Daisy. He shows his incredible voice as both a brother of a survivor, an ally, a coach, and a mentor to young athletes. His previous experience speaking at schools has led him to want to reach as many young athletes as possible.

SafeBAE is a student-focused, survivor-driven campaign whose mission is to raise awareness about sexual assault in middle and high schools and student’s rights under Title IX. SafeBAE focuses on preventing dating violence and sexual assault by giving students the tools to change peer culture, end harassing re-victimization, and advocate for consent and safe relationship education.

For more information, please contact Students for Violence Prevention (SVP) Student Coordinator, Caitlin Martin at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or SVP Advisor Ali Smith at 620-235-4831.

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Pittsburg State University
Overman Student Center
Contact: Ali Smith, Campus Victim Advocate
Phone: 620-235-4831
Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.


PDF of this release

Kansas Coalition Provides Services to All

KCSDV Provides Services to All, Regardless of Immigration Status

TOPEKA, KS – Recently, a domestic violence victim was arrested by Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) in El Paso, TX while seeking a protection order from her abuser. While not all details are known at this time, the Kansas Coalition Against Sexual and Domestic Violence is very concerned about the implications of what this could mean for victims of domestic and sexual violence who have immigration concerns.

Many times, a victim who has the courage to come forward and ask for help has to overcome many concerns before reaching out but to add the fear of being deported makes this situation much worse for victims.

“The Kansas Coalition Against Sexual and Domestic Violence is responding to this threat to victim safety by disseminating helpful resources across the state for programs and victims.” says Joyce Grover, Executive Director of KCSDV.

Perpetrators of domestic and sexual violence will often use a victims' immigration status as a way to control them, intimidating them with threats of deportation and possible separation from children and other family members. Abusers often lie about what the government might do to victims, raising fears even when victims have legal status.

“The precedent set by this incident in El Paso charts a new course, one that appears to marginalize the safety of victims of violence”, says Grover. “We want everyone to know that safe services are available across Kansas. Advocates have and will continue to provide safe, confidential services to all victims of domestic and sexual violence regardless of immigration status.”

MOCSA Recognized for Innovative and Effective Workplace Practices

05-25-2017

MOCSA Recognized for Innovative and Effective Workplace Practices Receives prestigious When Work Works Award KANSAS CITY, Mo.─ the Metropolitan Organization to Counter Sexual Assault (MOCSA) has been honored with a 2017 When Work Works Award for exemplary workplace practices. The prestigious When Work...

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NNEDV National Survey Results

05-19-2017

Survey Reveals Impact of Increased Immigration Enforcement on Victims Experiencing Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault Washington, DC (May 18, 2017) – On May 18th, seven national organizations – including Asian Pacific Institute on Gender-Based Violence (APIGBV), ASISTA, Casa de Esperanza: National...

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NSVRC Press Release - Visionary Voice Awards 2017

05-01-2017

National Sexual Violence Resource Center Recognizes Leaders in Sexual Assault Prevention With 2017 Visionary Voice Awards Recipients include trailblazers in advocacy, legislation and the justice system PRESS RELEASE: FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Enola, PA, April 11, 2017 – The National Sexual Violence Resource Center...

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Press Release - Audrie & Daisy Screening

03-28-2017

Student Groups Screen Documentary & Host TalkbackHighlighting Sexual Assault [PITTSBURG, KANS. – April 3, 2017] – Students for Violence Prevention (SVP) in coordination with Safehouse Crisis Center, the Tilford Group, Student Alliance for Gender Equality, and Gorillas in Your Midst present...

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Kansas Coalition Provides Services to All

02-16-2017

KCSDV Provides Services to All, Regardless of Immigration Status TOPEKA, KS – Recently, a domestic violence victim was arrested by Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) in El Paso, TX while seeking a protection order from her abuser. While not all details...

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NNEDV Response to ICE Actions

02-16-2017

NNEDV condemns ICE detention of immigrant victim of domestic violence.  FEBRUARY 16, 2017 - In El Paso, TX, a victim of domestic violence was seeking an order of protection from her abusive boyfriend when she was arrested in court by Immigration...

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KCSDV Press Release - Advocacy Day 2017

01-30-2017

Advocacy Day at Capitol for Sexual and Domestic Violence Programs For Immediate Release:  Monday, January 30, 2017 Contact:  Shannon KennedyKCSDV Communications Coordinatorskennedy@kcsdv.org785-232-9784 ext. 335 TOPEKA, KS – February 8th, Kansas Coalition Against Sexual & Domestic Violence will be hosting their 14th Annual Advocacy...

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KCSDV Press Release - 2017 Prevention Conference

01-23-2017

International Filmmaker and McArthur Fellow to give Keynotes at Topeka Conference For Immediate Release:  Monday, January 23, 2017 Contact:  Shannon KennedyKCSDV Communications Coordinatorskennedy@kcsdv.org785-232-9784 ext. 335 TOPEKA, KS – February, Kansas Coalition Against Sexual & Domestic Violence will be hosting their second conference for...

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