2018 CVRC Preconference Presenters

Gael B. Strack Gael Strack, Esq.
Alliance for HOPE International
Chief Executive Officer and Co-Founder
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101 W. Broadway, Suite 1770
San Diego, CA 92101
Toll Free: (888) 511-3522


Gael B. Strack is the Chief Executive Officer and Co-Founder of Alliance for HOPE International. Programs of the Alliance include: National Family Justice Center Alliance, Training Institute on Strangulation Prevention, Camp HOPE America, Justice Legal Network and VOICES Survivor Network.

  • The National Family Justice Center Alliance (www.familyjusticecenter.org) provides consulting to over 150 existing and pending Family Justice Centers across the world, helping communities open and sustain Family Justice Centers.
  • The Training Institute on Strangulation Prevention (www.strangulationtraininginstitue.com) provides basic and advanced training on strangulation prevention to 5,000 professionals annually.
  • The Justice Legal Network is an innovative public interest law firm made up of solo attorneys who have pledged to work with the Alliance in providing civil legal services to victims and their children.
  • Camp HOPE America, under the leadership of Casey Gwinn, provides summer camping, mentoring, hope and healing to children exposed to violence.
  • The VOICES Survivor Network is comprised of survivors who volunteer their time to provide awareness, education, outreach and feedback to their local Family Justice Center.

Prior to launching Alliance for Hope International with Casey Gwinn, Gael served as the Founding Director of the San Diego Family Justice Center from October 2002 through May 2007. In that capacity, she worked closely with 25 on-site agencies (government and non-profit) who came together in 2002 to provide services to victims of domestic violence and their children in one location. The San Diego Family Justice Center was featured on Oprah in January 2003, was recognized as a model program by President Bush and was the inspiration for the President’s Family Justice Center Initiative launched in October 2003.

Prior to her work at the Family Justice Center, Gael was a prosecutor at the San Diego City Attorney’s Office. She joined the office in 1987 and served in many capacities including Head Deputy City Attorney responsible for the Child Abuse and Domestic Violence Unit. Gael has also worked as a Deputy Public Defender and a Deputy County Counsel for the San Diego County Counsel’s office handling juvenile dependency matters. She graduated from Western State College of Law in December 1985.

Gael is a former board member of the California Partnership to End Domestic Violence, former President of the San Diego Domestic Violence Council and former commissioner of the ABA’s Commission on Domestic Violence. In her spare time, Gael is an adjunct law professor for California Western School of Law where she teaches “Domestic Violence and the Law.” Gael has been honored with numerous awards, including San Diego Attorney of the Year for 2006, and was the 2010 Recipient of the National Crime Victim Service Award for Professional Innovation in Victim Services by United States Attorney General Eric Holder. Gael has also co-authored a series of strangulation articles and five books with Casey Gwinn, JD, on the Family Justice Center movement. Gael and her husband, Jan, have two grown children, Samantha and Taylor, and are the proud grandparents of one grandchild – Emmett.

Dr. Bill Smock is the Police Surgeon and directs the Clinical Forensic Medicine Program for the Louisville Metro Police Department. He graduated from Centre College in Danville, Kentucky in 1981 and obtained a Master’s degree in Anatomy from the University of Louisville in 1987. Bill graduated from the University of Louisville, School of Medicine in 1990 and completed a residency in emergency medicine at the University of Louisville in 1993. In 1994, he became the first physician in the United States to complete a post-graduate fellowship in Clinical Forensic Medicine. Dr. Smock was an Assistant Medical Examiner with the Kentucky Medical Examiner’s Office from 1991 to 1997. Dr. Smock joined the faculty at University of Louisville’s Department of Emergency Medicine in 1994 and was promoted to the rank of full professor in 2005. Dr. Smock is currently a Clinical Professor of Emergency Medicine at the University of Louisville, School of Medicine and regularly takes medical students on mission trips to Africa. Dr. Smock has edited three textbooks on clinical forensic medicine and published more than 30 chapters and articles on forensic and emergency medicine. He is an internationally recognized forensic expert and trains nurses, physicians, law enforcement officers and attorneys in multiple fields including: officer-involved shootings, strangulation, gunshot wounds, injury mechanisms and motor vehicle trauma. Dr. Smock is also the Police Surgeon for the Jeffersontown, Kentucky and St. Matthews, Kentucky Police Departments. He also serves as a sworn tactical physician and detective for the Floyd County Indiana Sheriff’s Department.




Bill Smock William S. Smock, MD, MS, FACEP, FAAEM
Louisville Metro Police Department
The Clinical Forensic Medical Program
Director and Police Surgeon
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400 South First Street
Louisville, KY 92101


Dr. Bill Smock is the Police Surgeon and directs the Clinical Forensic Medicine Program for the Louisville Metro Police Department. He graduated from Centre College in Danville, Kentucky in 1981 and obtained a Master’s degree in Anatomy from the University of Louisville in 1987. Bill graduated from the University of Louisville, School of Medicine in 1990 and completed a residency in emergency medicine at the University of Louisville in 1993.

In 1994, he became the first physician in the United States to complete a post-graduate fellowship in Clinical Forensic Medicine. Dr. Smock was an Assistant Medical Examiner with the Kentucky Medical Examiner’s Office from 1991 to 1997. Dr. Smock joined the faculty at University of Louisville’s Department of Emergency Medicine in 1994 and was promoted to the rank of full professor in 2005. Dr. Smock is currently a Clinical Professor of Emergency Medicine at the University of Louisville, School of Medicine and regularly takes medical students on mission trips to Africa.

Dr. Smock has edited three textbooks on clinical forensic medicine and published more than 30 chapters and articles on forensic and emergency medicine. He is an internationally recognized forensic expert and trains nurses, physicians, law enforcement officers and attorneys in multiple fields including: officer-involved shootings, strangulation, gunshot wounds, injury mechanisms and motor vehicle trauma. Dr. Smock is also the Police Surgeon for the Jeffersontown, Kentucky and St. Matthews, Kentucky Police Departments. He also serves as a sworn tactical physician and detective for the Floyd County Indiana Sheriff’s Department.

Stop Sexual Violence Before It Starts

From the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Get the infographic pdf.

About 1 in 5 women have experienced rape or attempted rape in their lifetime.

About 1 in 15 men have been made to penetrate someone else during their lifetime.

Stopping sexual violence before it happens is a CDC priority.

It can be prevented.

CDC has developed a technical package to help states and communities use the best available evidence to prevent sexual violence.

STOP SEXUAL VIOLENCE

  • Teach skills to prevent sexual violence.
  • Provide opportunities to empower and support girls and women.
  • Create protective environments.
  • Support victims/survivors to lessen harms.
  • Promote social norms that protect against violence.

It is important to monitor and evaluate your efforts while the field of violence prevention continues to evolve.

Be a part of the solution. Learn more at www.cdc.gov/violenceprevention

Your prevention efforts may involve developing new partnerships or working across sectors, including:

  • Public Health
  • Government
  • Health Care Services
  • Social Services
  • Education
  • Businesses
  • Justice
  • Housing
  • Non-Governmental Organizations
  • Foundations

Together We Can Stop Sexual Violence.

ACT NOW!

Use CDC’s technical package to begin or expand your prevention efforts.

Additional program planning and implementation resources can be found on CDC websites:
www.cdc.gov/violenceprevention
vetoviolence.cdc.gov

Going to College

NSVRC TIP SHEET

Get the PDF

What Families Need to Know About Sexual Assault and Safety on Campus

 

National Sexual Violence Resource Center (NSVRC) is focused on providing parents, caregivers, and students the tools and resources necessary to create a safe and healthy campus experience. One of the most concerning issues young adults face is sexual assault. In addition to mobilizing campuses and communities to address this issue, it’s important for all parents to feel prepared and equipped to raise this topic with their children. NSVRC encourages parents and caregivers to address key topics relating to sexual assault and safety before their child leaves for college. Teaching young adults about this prevalent public health issue will better prepare them to deal with this issue in an informed way. This information is also essential in enabling your child to contribute to a campus culture that promotes safety, respect, and equality.

KNOW THE FACTS

It can be difficult to think and talk about sexual assault when your son or daughter is going off to college, but it’s important that you are both aware of the prevalent and frequent nature of sexual assault on campus.

  • One in five women and one in 16 men are sexually assaulted while in college.
  • More than 90 percent of sexual assaults go unreported.
  • Nearly two-thirds of college students experience sexual harassment.
  • Among college women, nine out of 10 victims of rape and sexual assault know their offender.

5 KEYS TO A HEALTHY RELATIONSHIP

It can be encouraging for parents to know that developing and supporting healthy relationships is critical to preventing sexual assault. Talk to your son or daughter about the five keys to healthy relationships — Respect, Learn, Empower, Consent, and Communicate — so they can contribute to a positive campus culture for themselves and their peers.

  • Respect: promote and model healthy attitudes and relationships
  • Learn: access credible information and resources to promote your overall health
  • Empower: everyone has the right to set limits, feel safe, and get support
  • Consent: seek mutual agreement without fear or pressure
  • Communicate: express yourself to partners, peers, and family

HOW TO TALK ABOUT CONSENT

Consent is one of the most important elements of any healthy sexual relationship. Sex without consent isn’t sex. It’s assault. Here’s what you can tell your son or daughter about consent:

  • Consent is voluntary, mutual, and can be withdrawn at any time.
  • Past consent does not mean current or future consent.
  • There is no consent when there is force, intimidation, or coercion.
  • There is no consent if a person is mentally or physically incapacitated or impaired because one cannot understand the fact, nature, or extent of the sexual situation, including due to alcohol or other drugs.

Learn more about consent.

DRUGS AND ALCOHOL

It’s no secret that drug use and alcohol consumption are widespread on college campuses across the country. Many studies show a direct relationship between excessive alcohol use, such as binge drinking, and risk for committing sexual assault. Research shows that approximately half of sexual assaults are associated with alcohol use by the perpetrator, victim, or both.

When you talk to your teen about drugs and alcohol, it’s crucial to stress that sexual assault is never the victim’s fault. It does not matter what the victim is wearing or doing, whether the victim has been drinking, or what type of relationship the victim has with the person who is abusing him or her.

QUESTIONS FOR YOUR CHILD’S COLLEGE

It’s important to know how your child’s school handles sexual assault. In 2014, 40 percent of colleges and universities reported not investigating a single sexual assault in the previous five years. While most colleges still have work to do in creating safe and supportive environments, the good news is that many schools have begun implementing promising policies and programs, and Title IX is increasingly helping to enforce proper handling of sexual assault.

Below are some questions to pose. Campus Police, Student Affairs, and the Office of Resident Life are all good places to start as you look to get your questions answered.

  • Where can I review the policies and procedures used by this institution to respond to a report of sexual assault?
  • What sexual assault training is provided to faculty and staff, including resident assistants?
  • What counseling or services are available for victims of sexual assault, both on and off campus?
  • How can I learn more about what this campus is doing to prevent sexual assault and support victims?

For more information on this topic, visit www.nsvrc.org.

Information provided by:
National Sexual Violence Resource Center

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www.nsvrc.org.

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